Contents

 

Interview: Impact of BIM Technology on Architects
Phillip Bernstein, Vice President at Autodesk
 
Essay: Building Bust
Hans Ibelings
 
Feature:
Recent Museums
 
 
For the past dozen years or so, at a pace of about once a year,a+u has devoted a feature section to recent museums. Lookingback over this period, there have been significant extensions towell-known museums, such as the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao(1997), the extension of The Museum of Modern Art in New York(2005), and branch museums for the Muse du Louvre and CentrePompidou. At the same time, a number of trends have emerged,such as closer collaboration between architects and curators, andgreater involvement by artists with the exhibition space.
This issue highlights another recent trend, involving museumsthat are firmly rooted in the community or small in scale but setoff by distinguishing characteristics. Together with recent projectssuch as the new Porsche Museum, we will introduce museumsin locations such as Santa Cruz de Tenerife of Canary Islands,Porto Alegre in Brazil, Alstahaug in Norway, Lolland in Denmark,and Ruthin in Wales. These museums are characterized by theselection of sustainable materials, symbioses with adjacentbuildings, formal reflections of the landscape, and renovation ofhistoric buildings. Now that the global construction rush is over,what do they have to tell us?
 
Delugan Meissl Associated Architects
Porsche Museum
 
Herzog & de Meuron
TEA, Tenerife Space of the Arts
 
Alvaro Siza Vieira
Iberê Camargo Museum
 
Adolf Krischanitz
Temporre Kunsthalle Berlin
 
Tony Fretton
Fuglsang Kunstmuseum
 
Allied Works Architecture
Museum of Arts and Design
 
Sergison Bates Architects
Ruthin Craft Centre
 
Snohetta
Petter Dass Museum
 
Daniel Libeskind
Royal Ontario Museum
 
Neutelings Riedijk Architecten
Museum for City History, Antwerp
 
Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos
Moritzburg Museum Extension
 
Bruno Mader
Ecomuseum in Les Landes
 
Report: Naoshima Islands: Museums and Regional Revitalization

Contents

 

Feature:
Collective Housing
 
In this issues essay, Ramias Steinmann argues that collective housing has always responded architecturally to the changes of society, economy and culture. At the same time, he pointed out that, after 1980s, collective housing has failed to find themes which are shared and pursued by architects. Now, as the first decade of the new milenium is closing, it is time for us to begin to think about what the themes of contemporay collective housing could be.
This issue includes 15 collective housing projects from Europe, America, and Asia, completed in recent years. The locations of the projects varies from metropolis like Paris and New York to the midst of a Chinese forest. Each site has unique characters, they are financed differently (government or private) and have varied demographics, all these factors affect each project differently in their form, volume and site plannning. In other words, they exhibit a unique composition in their own contexts. At the same time, from the design of details such as the exterior cladding or the openings, one can recognize the presence of the architects intention to control the immediate surrounding of the project architecturally. Although it might be difficult to identify a common theme shared by architects as Steinmann argues, there is a possibility that an emerging theme will arise from the individuality of works which stand between the scale of the dwelling and that of the urban.(a+u)
 
Essay: A Matter of Selection
Ramias Steinemann
 
 
David Chipperfield
Ninetree Village
 
Jakob + MacFarlane
100 Social Apartments
 
Gigon / Guyer
Brunnenhof Housing Complex Apartments for Large Families
Residential Housing, Diggelmannstrasse
 
Bernard Tschumi Architectes
Blue
 
Jean Nouvel
40 Mercer Residences
 
OMA
23 East 22nd Street
 
John Pawson
50 Gramercy Park North
 
dosmasuno arquitectos
102 Apartments in Carabanchel
 
Belzunce, Diaz-Maurio and Ga Milln + De Lapuerta and
Burgos
Urban Planning and Social Housing in La Mina del Morro
 
Mei Architecten en stedenbouwers
Schiecentrale Phase 4B
 
Meyer en Van Schooten Architecten, Heren 5 Architecten, Cie.
La Grande Cour
 
WOHA Architects
Newton Suites
 
Toyo Ito
Belle Vue Residences
 
URBANUS
Urban Tulou

Contents

 

Feature:
Dominique Perrault / DPA Today
 
 
This is the second issue of a+u devoted to the architecture of Dominique Perrault. The previous one, which appeared in April 2003, introduced his innovative use of many kinds of softly enveloping metallic fabrics, as embodied primarily in works that were then still in planning.
 
This issue turns to some recent projects, with a focus on harmony between architecture and the environment another theme that has occupied him throughout his career. Among the works introduced are the Campus Valley at Ewha Womans University in Seoul, completed in May 2008, the Court of Justice of the European Communities in Luxembourg, and the Olympic Tennis Center in Madrid.
 
Three essays, by Frdric Migayrou, Luis Fernndez-Galiano, and Perrault himself, examine an architectural strategy of disappearance. In the words of Migayrou, Architecture that disappears, erases itself, is no longer an obstacle, a frontier between man and his surroundings, is the contradictory domain of practice Dominique Perrault has dedicated himself to.
 
The article on Ewha Womans University contains newly commissioned photos taken in May of this year. The works in this issue, some still incomplete, offer a perspective on the state of Dominique Perraults architecture at this point in time, and hints of its future course. (a+u)
 
 
Essay: History and Geography
Dominique Perrault
 
Studio Dominique Perrault Architecture
 
Ewha Womans University
 
Essay: Geometry of Disappearance
Frdric Migayrou
 
Court of Justice of the European Communities
 
Olympic Tennis Center
 
Essay: Bote Miracles: Olympic Tennis Center
Luis Fernndez-Galiano
 
Arganzuela Footbridge
 
San Pellegrino Thermal Baths
 
DC Towers
 
Fukoku Tower
 
Hotel ME
 
Priory Park Pavilion
 
NH-Fieramilano Hotel, 4* Category
 
Noh Theater / Butterfly Pavilion

Contents

 

Feature:
Utzon, Fehn and Now
Architecture in Denmark and Norway
 
Two master architects of the 20th century passed away in 2008 and 2009: Danish architect Jrn Utzon (19182008), whodesigned the Sydney Opera House (1973), a World Heritage Site;and Norwegian architect Sverre Fehn (19242009), who designedthe Nordic Pavilion, Venice Biennale (1962). Both are consideredlegitimate successors of the Scandinavian modernists. This issuefeatures their last works in the opening pages of the issue. KimUtzon talks about his collaboration with his father on the UtzonCenter, completed after Jrn Utzons death. Thomas McQuillanwrites on Sverre Fehn and Fehns influence, based on interviewswith three young Norwegian architects.
This issue also introduces recent architectural projects in Denmark and Norway with two essays: Transformation of the Copenhagen Harbor and Norwegian Architecture Between the Poetic and the Politic. How has the tradition ofScandinavian architecture evolved in these two countries afterUtzon and Fehn? (a+u)
 
Denmark
 
Essay: Transformation of the Copenhagen Harbour
Jens Kvorning
 
Jrn Utzon and Kim Utzon Architects
Utzon Center
 
Essay: Collaborating with My Father on the Utzon Center
Kim Utzon
 
Jean Nouvel
Concert House Danish Radio
 
Gottlieb Paludan + NOBEL
Danish Broadcasting Corporation, Segment 3
 
Lundgaard & Tranberg
Royal Danish Playhouse
Tietgen Dormitory
 
Henning Larsen Architects
Opera in Copenhagen
 
 
Norway
 
Essay: Norwegian Architecture Between the Poetic and the Politic
Mirei Yoshida
 
Sverre Fehn
New Protective Buildings at Hedmark Museum
The National Museum Architecture
 
Essay: After Fehn
Thomas McQuillan
 
Helen & Hard
Pulpit Rock Basecamp
Pulpit Rock Mountain Lodge
Geopark
 
Haugen / Zohar Arkitekter
Fireplace for Children
 
National Tourist Routes Project
 
Jensen & Skodvin
Gudbrandsjuvet Landscape Hotel
 
Carl-Viggo Hlmebakk
Strmbu Service Center and Rest Area

Contents

 

Feature: Kerry Hill
Crafting Modernism in Asia Pacific
 
In this issue, we feature the works of Kerry Hill, who is firmly rooted in modernism and questions its relevance in this day and age, and also in the context of the land and its culture.
 
The selected projects consist of various typologies and locales ranging from houses to institutions, with a focus on those in the Asia Pacific region amongst his many other works around the world. The major works featured here are Amankora in Bhutan, ITC Sonar Bangla and Aman New Delhi in India, all newly photographed for this issue.
 
Along with these projects, we include three articles. The first is Geoffrey Londons essay, An Evolving Practice, which tracks the trajectory of Kerry Hills career and the refinement of his designs. In Erwin J. S. Virays interview and the conversation between Kerry Hill and three young Singaporean architects, we explore Kerry Hills interest in spatial composition, site and context, and the challenges of architecture and practice in Singapore. (a+u)
 
 
Essay: An Evolving Practice
Geoffrey London
 
Amankora Paro
 
Amankora Thimpu
 
Amankora Punakha
 
Amankora Gangtey
 
Essay: Bhutan and Amankora
Kerry Hill
 
The Lalu
 
Soi 53 Apartments
 
The Chedi Chiang Mai
 
Ogilvie House
 
State Theatre Centre of Western Australia
 
Interview: Kerry Hill
The Felt Structure of Reality
Interviewer: Erwin J.S. Viray
 
Genesis
 
Singapore Cricket Association Pavilion
 
Singapore Zoological Gardens New Entrance Plaza
 
Garlick Avenue House
 
Conversation: Kerry Hill and Young Architects
Thoughts on Site, Space and the Future
Colin Seah, Chang Yong Ter and Tan Cheng Ling
 
Black Pavilion
 
Aman New Delhi
 
ITC Sonar Bangla

Contents

 

Feature 1: John Hejduk, Reprint
Feature 2: Perceptual Space
 
Feature 1:
John Hejduk, Reprint
 
Who is John Hejduk?, a first year architecture student asked. We were in studio, year 2009, browsing through the Mask of Medusa: Works, 19471983, admiring the drawings, sketches, texts; appreciative of the line weights, the layout of the drawings, the narrative, and the exploration of the language of architecture.
 
I replied that he is an inspiration, someone who opened a world of imagination, extended the boundaries of architecture beyond built architecture to the realm of dream, poetry and creation. He is a role model in the pursuit of finding expressions of the language of architecture; an influential educator, Dean of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at the Cooper Union from 1972 to 2000, where he opened the path for conversation of various people and disciplines.
 
Peter Eisenman in the catalogue for IAUS, John Hejduk: 7 Houses in 1980, wrote, Hejduk is first and foremost a teacher, it was an accident of both time and place that Hejduk became a teacher, he thought and still thinks of himself as a builder. He explains the 7 houses featured in the catalogue and the particular drawing technique where Hejduk used fine pencil, the brittle 8H and 9H, where drawings inherently began to suggest architectural content where to see the houses casually as Palladian or Miesian is to miss the energy impacted in each small gesture, gestures so filled with architectural content. That one must look hard to find their delicate, almost imperceptible energy this tradition suggests a work on the language of architecture.
 
Daniel Libeskind in the introduction to the Mask of Medusa in 1984 wrote, What is decisive about his work is that it leads to a different place, on which is both alien and inalienable: a place which consecrates Architecture with mysteries that are no longer decipherable within the ordinary code of mimesis Hejduks work unconceals what cannot be seen when one only looks at cities, bridges, towers, swing-sets, prisons, ferris-wheels, even farmland. His architecture apprehends the Invisible in them.
 
Perceptively, a second year student observed: Hejduks drawings evoke forgotten memories, images of the modern project in the 1920s and 1930s: expressionism, futurism, constructivism, suprematism, purism, de Stijl, cubism, etc, though expressed in a different language. I add, that it seems that the seeds of the modern project manifested in those times and seemingly halted by historical accidents, are projected into the changing need of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. Timely, indeed NOW, that this opens a dialogue with the works of Hejduk on the possibilities of the language of architecture.
The a+u special feature on John Hejduk in January 1991, opened a decisive encounter. The reprint of the issue, continues the pursuit of the language of architecture, making it possible to remember forgotten dreams and projects, and encourage the courage to create alternative forms of making and expressing architecture. This reprint is a vital reminder for an old man like me, as it is a decisive encounter too for the first year student of architecture asking, Who is John Hejduk?
 
Erwin J.S.Viray / Assistant professor at the National University of Singapore
 
 
NEW CONTENTS
 
Essay: The Wall as Event
Michael Hays
 
Interview: Shigeru Ban
What I Learned From John Hejduk
 
The Wall House #2
 
REPRINT
 
Editors Introduction
 
Essay by David Shapiro
An Introduction to John Hejduks Works: Surgical Architecture
 
A Poem for John Hejduk by David Shapiro
After a Lost Original / The Snow Is Alive / Walter Benjamin: A Lost Poem / In Germany / After Asturiana / You Are Tall and Thin / Prayer For My Son / To My Son / House of The Secret / For Victims
 
Housings
BERLIN
TEGEL
 
Conversation Between John Hejduk and David Shapiro:
The Architect Who Drew Angels
 
Works
LONDON Collapse of Time
OSLO Security
RIGA
ATLANTA The House of The Suicide and The House of The Mother of The Suicide
 
Essays and Poem by John Hejduk
Architecture and The Pathognomic
Evening in Llano
The Sleep of Adam
 
 
Feature 2 :
Perceptual Space
 
One of the defining characteristics of architecture, one that makes it what it is, is that people can touch it and go inside it. It is fair to say that architecture is what it is because it has interior spaces, and that interior spaces exist because of architecture. Also, compared to architecture itself, interior spaces are closer to human bodily perceptions.
Recently we are seeing more interior designs that represent crystallizations of interactive relations between people and space. These designs reveal the poverty of the view that regards interiors as nothing more than decoration. Looking outside architecture, we also see a transition away from the previous emphasis on materials and visuals and toward designs that stimulate all five of our senses. Instead of closure as the goal, we see designs that leave something open to explore in the future an approach that resonates with the recent trend toward sustainability and lessening the burden on the environment.
This issue introduces some of the most prominent representatives of this moment in interior design, and examines from a variety of perspectives the fertile relationships between space and human perceptions.
We can feel a new wind blowing, one that is bringing not more show but more reality.
Naomi Shibata
 
PROJECTS
 
OMA/AMO
Spring/Summer 2010 PRADA Men&Women Fashion Show
Background of Design: Collaboration between OMA/AMO and PRADA
 
Jean NouvelLes Bains des Docks
Background of Design: Formcoating Technology used in Play Area for Children
 
Karim RashidChelsea Loft
Background of Design: Karim Rashid Universe
 
LOT-EKPUMA CITY
Background of Design: Making Mobile Building
 
John PawsonMonastery of Our Lady of Novy Dvur
Background of Design: Detail Drawings of Monastery of Our Lady of Novy Dvur
 
Frédéric Flamand + Humberto & Fernando Campana
Metamorphoses
Background of Design: To Recycle is to Metamorphose
 
Philippe RahmInterior Gulf Stream
Background of Design: Designing Space is Designing Climate
 
Zaha Hadid
JS Bach / Zaha Hadid Architects Chamber Music Hall
Background of Design: Acoustic Design for JS Bach Music Hall
 
Maison Martin Margiela After Party Show
Background of Design: New Perspective by Maison Martin Margiela
 
Zecc Architecten Church of Living
Background of Design: Zeccs Vision on Restoration between Different Functions
 
FEATURES
 
Smart Sustainability
Sustainable Dance Club / Parupu / 10-Unit System
 
Momentary Space
How to Create Fahion Shows / Les Sept Planches de la Ruse / Die Frau ohne Schatten
 
Perceptions of Art Space
we know nothing about space / Dialogue in the Dark /
Flow 5.0 / Dune 4.1
 
FILES
 
NEXT architects + Claudia Linders, House M&M
51N4E, WET89
Arkitekturverkstedet i Oslo / Asplan Viak, WeSC Concept Store
Sebastian Mariscal, Pio Pio Restaurant
Serie Architects, Blue Frog Acoustic Lounge and Studios
Office dA, BANQ
Point Supreme Architects, Aktipis Flower Shop
Toshiba + takram + Ryo Matsui, Overture
Lissoni Associati + Highland Associates + Erwin Hauer, Elie Tahari Fashion Studio
Camenzind Evolution, Googles new EMEA Engineering Hub
J. Mayer H. Architects, positive.negative
UXUS, McVillage
Merkx + Girod architects, Bookstore Selexyz Dominicanen
Heatherwick Studio, La Masion Unique Longchamp
Ryuji Nakamura, Snow/Jins Global Standard Aoyama
 
PEOPLE
 
Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec
 
EXHIBITION REPORT
 
Opening Soon Anniina Koivu
 
Feature 2 Editor/Art director: Naomi Shibata

Contents

 

Feature:
Toyo Ito Architecture and Place
 
a+u has previously published two feature issues on the architecture of Toyo Ito Under Construction (May 2004) and Beyond the Image (June 2005). This issue extends the series with a feature on projects by Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects that are currently under construction or about to break ground. Entitled Architecture and Place, it describes projects in six regions around the world: Taiwan (Taipei and Taichung), Spain (Barcelona and Madrid), the West Coast of the United States (Berkeley), Chile (Marbella), Singapore, and the Inland Sea of Japan (Imabari). In addition to details of the projects, we have included reports from the sites and photos of the buildings under construction. We have also included contributions from project architects in the office who have been active in these regions. Their candid descriptions of the rewards and challenges of working overseas offer a glimpse into the processes through which innovative architecture is realized.
The feature ends with a conversation moderated by Hironori Matsubara. It offers insights into the lithe but determined approach of an architectural office working in market economies where architecture is consumed as a good like any other. (a+u)
 
Preface: Architecture and Place
Toyo Ito
 
Essay: Building in Taiwan
Rintaro Yabe
 
Taichung Metropolitan Opera House
 
National Taiwan University, New College of Social Sciences
 
Songshan Tobacco Plant Culture Park
 
Essay: Building in Spain
Yutaka Kita
 
Extension for The Fair of Barcelona Gran Via Venue + Torres Porta Fira
 
Gavia Park
 
Essay: Building on the West Coast of USA
Ryu Mitarai
 
University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
 
Essay: Building in Chile
Isadora Droppelmann Lira
 
White O
 
Essay: Building in Singapore
Yoshitaka Ihara
 
VivoCity
 
Belle Vue Residences
 
Market Street Tower
 
Essay: Building on an Island in the Seto Inland Sea
Michiko Okano
 
Toyo Ito Architecture Museum in Imabari
 
The New Deichman Main Library Competition in Oslo, Norway
 
Conversation:Architecture and Place Architecture Built by Dialogue
Toyo Ito, Hironori Matsubara and staff architects at Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects / Toyohiko Kobayashi, Atsushi Ito, Yoshitaka Ihara, Rintaro Yabe, Ryu Mitarai, Michiko Okano

Contents

 

Feature:
Materials / Treatments
 
Ceramic, glass, concrete and metals are ordinary materials architects are familiar with. Through new treatments and interpretation, these ordinary materials can be transformed by technology resulting in new architectural effects. When glass is printed, sight lines are altered, creating various degrees of transparency. In the form of a fabric, metal acquires malleability instead of rigidity. By engraving patterns onto concrete, the smooth surface takes on a new texture. The projects in this issue are marked by this characteristic that could lead us into new expectations for the future of building and construction. In his essay, Blaine Brownell introduces a host of new materials that are developed due to environmental concerns, a surge in technological advancements and the rise of developing cities. As we enter a new decade, inevitable change to architecture, construction and resources await us. As Brownell advocates, it is precisely the intersection of environmental, technological, and design innovation that holds the most promising future for architecture.(a+u)
 
Essay: Testing Ground: Emergent Green Materials and Architectural Effects
Blaine Brownell
 
sauerbruch hutton
Museum Brandhorst
 
Essay: Augmenting Collage City
Raymund Ryan
 
Foreign Office Architects
John Lewis Department Store and Cineplex
 
3DELUXE
Leonardo Glass Cube
 
Stefano Boeri Architetti
Ex Arsenal at La Maddalena
 
Asymptote
The Yas Hotel
 
Caruso St John Architects
Nottingham Contemporary
 
Eduardo Souto de Moura
Museu Paula Rgo
 
David Chipperfield and b720 Arquitectos
City of Justice
 
Mangado y Asociados, S.L.
Archaeology Museum of Vitoria
 
UN Studio
MUMUTH, House for Music and Music Theater
 
HHF architects andAi Weiwei
Artfarm
 
Heatherwick Studio
Aberystwyth Business Units
 
MMA Architects
Design Indaba 1010 Housing Project
 
Treusch Architecture
Extension of the Ars Electronica Center
 
Chuck Hoberman
Expanding Video Screen for U2 360 Tour
 
Architektur & LandschaftLandmark in the Lusatian Lakeland

Contents

 

Feature:
Reinvigorating 20th Century
Masterpieces
 
Certain buildings constructed in the 20th century are presently faced with the crisis of demolition. There can be no doubt that even the 20th century masterpieces, praised as symbols of architecture, are not to be demolished. It seems that the development of new materials and new technology have made it possible to construct buildings to a scale that was unimaginable 50 or 100 years ago, and that these buildings today have a larger degree of freedom in their form. There might be various ideas about life expectancy of the building in the built environment while considering factors such as the economy, convenience, and safety, among others.
This issue focuses on 20th century masterpieces that have recently experienced restoration, conservation, renovation or extension. While Eero Saarinens TWA Terminal (1962) was restored and revived through its linkage to the new extension, Paul Rudolphs Art and Architecture Building in Yale University was also restored, but carefully unified with its extension. After repeated repairs and additions, Louis I. Kahns Yale University Art Gallery (1953) and Ludwig Mies van der Rohes IIT Crown Hall (1956) are now both restored to its original design. With the application of modern technologies, Walter Gropiuss Bauhaus Building in Dessau (1926) and Frank Lloyd Wrights Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1959) have been restored to a state similar to that of their completion day, and will continue to be conserved for the future. Jorn Utzons Sydney Opera House (1973) has incorporated Building Information Modeling into its restoration process, and is currently researching its possibilities for use in future restorations.
 
The methods of conservation and renovation of buildings are unique as each building has an individual solution, from strict adherence to the original design to a flexible expansion and rebuilding. While the methods of reinvigoration are different, we will be able to see the original architects vision inherent within the buildings when we stand in front of them. (a+u)
 
Gensler
TWA Terminal and JetBlue Airways Terminal 5
 
Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Alice Tully Hall
 
Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects
Yale University Arts Complex
 
Polshek Partnership Architects
Yale University Art Gallery
 
Essay:Restoring Yale
Paul Needham
 
Brambach und Ebert Architektenand
Pfister Schiess Tropeano & Partner
Conservation of the Bauhaus Building in Dessau
 
Essay:The Bauhaus Revisited
Ulf Meyer
 
Wank Adams Slavin Associates
Conservation of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
 
Exhibition review:Frank Lloyd Wright: From Within Outward
John Gendall
 
Krueck + Sexton Architects
Crown Hall IIT
 
Richter & Dahl Rocha
Nestl WellNes Center
 
Allies and Morrison Architects
Royal Festival Hall
 
John McAslan + Partners
De La Warr Pavilion
 
Alvaro Siza Vieira
Lea Landscaping Project and Swimming Pool
 
Utzon ArchitectsandJohnson Pilton Walker
Sydney Opera House Renovation Projects
 
Le Corbusier and Jose Oubrerie
Firminy Church

Contents

 

Feature:
Architecture in Belgium and the Netherlands
 
In 2003 and 2004, a+u devoted special issues did features on
the architecture of Belgium (a+u03:05 and 03:06) and the
Netherlands (a+u04:05). Since then, significant changes haveoccurred in the context that makes architecture possible there.
In the autumn of 2009, we visited 20 architects in Belgium and the Netherlands for a look at the current state of architecture in these two countries.
Formerly it was said in Belgium that good architecture wasbuilt mainly in suburbs. Now, due to rapid urbanization, the focus is moving toward city centers. While retaining traditional elements, current architecture employs new materials and new construction methods to create distinctive buildings.
In the Netherlands, the global recession has brought an end to the erstwhile surge in development projects. But new currents are emerging, as innovative ideas and an uncompromising pursuit of quality are applied to extensions and renovations.
The changes currently underway in Belgium and the
Netherlands can be traced through the statements of identity at the top of the contributions from the architects, and through the essays by Koen Van Synghel and Egbert Koster, which explore the milieu of architecture in these two countries. (a+u)
 
Essay:Belgian Architecture
Koen Van Synghel
 
Xaveer De Geyter ArchitectenandStphane Beel
Ghent University Campus Economy Building and UFO Building
 
Xaveer De Geyter Architecten
College of Europe University Institute of Postgraduate European Studies
 
sculp(IT) architecten
The Smallest House of Antwerp
 
Jan De Vylder Architecten
Les Ballets C de la B and LOD
 
Wim Goes Architectuur
Refuge
 
dmvA architecten
Blob
 
NU architectuuratelier
office/home LINQ
 
Eddy FranoisandCaroline De Wolf
House in the Woods
 
Office Kersten Geers David Van Severen
Bridge for the Handelsbeurs Concert Hall
 
Robbrecht en Daem Architecten
St-Felix Warehouse
 
Essay:Ideal Buildings vs. Built Ideas the Netherlands
Egbert Koster
 
MVRDV
Didden Village
 
Rocha Tombal Architecten
Meditation Center in Water Tower
House Bierings
 
Karres en Brands
De Nieuwe Ooster Columbarium
 
Architectenbureau Paul de Ruiter
Villa Berkel
 
Zecc Architecten
Water Tower of Living, Soest
 
Ren van Zuuk
Pavilion in Roosendaal
 
Atelier Kempe Thill
Theater Podium Grotekerkplein
 
OTH
Kraanspoor
 
TANGRAM
Crystal Court
 
Claus en Kaan Architecten
Crematorium Heimolen

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