Tsuchihashi House

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima ©Shinkenchiku-sha
On a small site in tokyo, tightly surrounded by neighboring houses, the 72 m2 (775 ft2) home’s light penetrates into the lower levels. 

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima ©Shinkenchiku-sha
Each level is defined by its use. The main living space is located in the partially-sunken basement level.

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima © Shinkenchiku-sha
Kitchen and dining areas occupy the ground level, with bathroom and bedroom levels above. In addition to a terrace adjacent to the bathroom, there is also roof balcony which provides access to sunlight and fresh air.

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima © Shinkenchiku-sha
The floor openings connect these spaces vertically throughout the building.

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima © Shinkenchiku-sha
The terrace on the bathroom floor provides a visual connection to the sky from the living room below. It also can be viewed from the bedroom and roof balcony above. The kitchen/dining room is daylit both by the light entering its own window, as well as from windows above.

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima © Shinkenchiku-sha
The supporting structure is entirely exposed and was designed to be as small-scale as possible, in order to match the scale of the furniture.  The floors consist of 25 mm-thick (1 inch) corrugated steel decking riveted to the underside of a 3.2 mm-thick (1/8 inch) steel plate. The light structure improves the sense of spaciousness and airiness within this very compact home.

JA+U : Tsuchihasi House by Kazuyo Sejima © Shinkenchiku-sha
The vertical configuration creates a spacious living in a densely inhabited city.

Kazuyo Sejima and Associates was founded in 1987. She was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 2010 with Ryue Nishizawa, co-founder of their architectural unit SANAA. Some of her recent projects such as Office Building in Shibaura, Inujima Art House Project, and Villa in Hayama are featured in our magazines.