Hironaka House

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates
The house is separated into two distinct components. The triangular ground floor is buried underground. The sleeping quarters are located behind a Chinese green slate wall, intended to resemble an demolished retaining wall.

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates
The living / dining space faces a private garden, secluded below retaining walls.

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates
An artist’s studio and a Japanese tearoom reside within the polyhedron. The exterior stairway connects it with the the living spaces below.

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates
The tearoom is accessed from the roji – an ornamental garden – where the guests ritually cleanse their hands and mouths in a tsukubai – stone water basin – and duck into the room through a small hatch called a nijiriguchi.

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates

JA+U : Hironaka House by Ken Yokogawa Architect & Associates
Natural light is admitted into the atelier through windows cut into the polyhedron’s facets. The light reflects off the interior surfaces, creating a seemingly infinite expanse within the compact volume. 

Hironaka House – along with Yamamoto House – is one of the residences designed by Ken Yokogawa featured in our recently-published, bilingual book: Ken Yokogawa: Landscape and Houses.